The Forbidden Fruit

 

I was wondering if Disney ‘borrowed’ the poisonous apple from the notorious forbidden fruit’s image that’s always been portrayed as an apple for as long as I could remember. Made me wonder who exactly apple pissed in its past life to obtain such an image. I’m still talking about apple the fruit by the way. I’m not into starting tech-dom war or anything like that. As far as technology goes, I am a total pacifist.

But let’s get back to apple the fruit.

If apple the fruit had indeed pissed of anyone it’ll be the doctors for sure. What with some smart guys starting spreading the catchy sing-a-song phrase “Eat an apple a day, keep the doctor away.” And everyone knows that doctors are modern day witches. And everyone also happens to know that the evil queen of the Snow White land was a witch. Tada.  Silver line? Threaded. Now moving on.

Okay. You all probably want to know what Google says about this and is too lazy to open up a new browser just to retype the whole thing in. And since Google was too lazy as well to answer me directly, he passed it to one of his minions, Wikipedia, who happens to be my favorite oracle.

Here goes on the topic of Apple as the forbidden fruit.

Apple – In Western Europe, the fruit was often depicted as an apple, possibly because of a misunderstanding of, or a pun on mălum, a native Latin noun which means evil (from the adjective malus), and mālum, another Latin noun, borrowed from Greek, which means apple. In the Vulgate, Genesis 2:17 describes the tree as de ligno autem scientiae boni et mali: “but of the tree (lit. wood) of knowledge of good and evil” (mali here is the genitive of malum). The larynx in the human throat, noticeably more prominent in males, was consequently called an Adam’s apple, from a notion that it was caused by the forbidden fruit sticking from Adam’s throat as he swallowed.

Pretty boring huh?

Until I saw this part.

Mushroom – A fresco in the 13th-century Plaincourault Abbey in France depicts Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, flanking a Tree of Knowledge that has the appearance of a gigantic Amanita muscaria, a poisonous and psychoactive mushroom. Writer/philosopher Terence McKenna in the entheogen theory proposed that the fruit of knowledge was a reference to psychotropic plants and fungus, which played a central role, he theorized, in human intellectual evolution.

Now , now, now. I surely can’t be the only person thinking that evil apple must’ve been laced with something more potent than vitamins, no? I always thought that “the apple” of the forbidden fruit per say would’ve made much more sense had they have those psychotropic ingredients in them. Why? Well, for the obvious reason that those ingredients are to this day still causing humans to do exactly what they feel like doing, stripping them of previous inhibitions. They also have been known to help you enter this feel good zone, thinking that some random handsome prince with no breath odor problem would kiss you softly and court you into this grand royal wedding. As history has spoken, social climbing is now the much preferred way to achieve the same objective due to its lack of negative side effects apart from diminishing private space it seems.

So climb away, dear. Climb away.

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About inifeli

Sketch a lot, write a lot, read a lot. Live a lot.

3 comments

  1. “I was wondering if Disney ‘borrowed’ the poisonous apple…” Actually he borrowed the story, and most of his fairytales, from the Brother’s Grimm fairytales (though the originals are much more violent and, well, grim!).

    Interesting post. I’m intrigued by the mushroom aspect.

Well, I'd say....

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